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Friday, October 29, 2021

Stanford autism therapy app research study-done from home!

 Below is information about a research opportunity at Stanford University for children with autism 3-12 years old. Please let me know if you have any questions!  (My contact info is below) If you know of families who may be interested, please feel free to share! 

Stanford University is looking for families to participate in a remote study where they will test an App designed to help children with autism improve social communication and emotion recognition skills. 


Eligibility: To participate, you must be a parent (18+ years old) of a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) between the ages of 3 and 12 years old. Participants can live anywhere in the world, but do need a smartphone or tablet with access to WiFi. (App is iOs and Android compatible)

You can enroll and get started here: https://guesswhatstudy.stanford.edu/ [nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com]
 
Procedure: All study participation is done from home. After completing initial measures, participants will be randomized to treatment or control conditions. Treatment participants will play the study app 3 times a week for 4 weeks (15-20 minutes total each week) and Control participants will receive the app 8 weeks after completing initial survey. We provide you with the mobile game for free, as well as a $50 Amazon gift card following completion of all study procedures, and  up to an additional $20 gift card for completion of additional follow-up measures.

After you complete the survey linked above, you will receive study instructions from the team within 1 week.

Don't hesitate to reach out with any questions!

Kindly,
Kaiti

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Kaiti Dunlap
Clinical Research Coordinator
The Wall Lab at Stanford University
kaiti.dunlap@stanford.edu
650-497-9214

For participant’s rights, contact the Stanford Institutional Review Board at 1-866-680-2906

Monday, October 18, 2021

How I use "masking" to Help With My Experience as an Autistic Woman

 "I didn’t even know what ‘masking’ was until long after I was diagnosed with autism. It’s defined as ‘camouflaging or compensating’ and ‘a social survival strategy’. 

For me, it works in the same way that makeup does. When I feel insecure about my natural looks, I wear makeup to make myself feel more confident. It allows me to not stand out as much and I feel like I ‘fit in’ with most of society. 

Masking is very similar – it’s a technique that involves adopting traits, mannerisms and mimicking others’ behaviour to blend in."

Read more here at Metro.