Wednesday, June 7, 2017

FREE Online Autism Training from the OPI Montana Autism Education Project


The OPI Montana Autism Education Project is offering 35 hours of online training in Teaching Procedures (24 hours) and Behavior Interventions (11 hours) to public school staff in Montana who educate students with autism spectrum disorders. A listing and description of the training content is attached to this message. The training can be taken for OPI renewal units and ASHA CEUs.


You can find more information and register for the online training here. New groups start the first week of each month and you will be sent information then. 

These are some of the results of our post-training survey:





IMPORTANT INFORMATION IF YOU ARE TAKING THE TRAINING FOR ASHA CEUs:

Information for Speech-Language Providers

ASHA members and/or MT state licensed SLPs are qualified to earn ASHA CEUs for completing the online Relias Learning curriculum. In 2011, a MT licensed SLP completed the ATS training as an "Independent Study" course and earned ASHA CEUs.

ASHA requires that Independent Study activities are approved 30 days prior to the start of the learning activity.

Independent Study forms should be dated at least 30 days prior to the date of the first certificate for completing a module. Below is a link for the ASHA Independent-study form. Participants fill out the form and send it to Valeria Schmauch. Independent study plans are limited to 20 hours.

The link below will take you directly to the Independent Study form:

http://www.asha.org/ce/self-direct/isteps/

Valeria Schmauch, MSHA CEA    msha.vs.cea2014@gmail.com


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Friday, September 16, 2016

2017 General & Special Education Conference - Seattle March 8, 9, 10, 2017

There are several sessions related to autism. 

Newsletter of the Association for Science in Autism Treatment



You can view the newsletter here. 

Disproportionality in Indian Country: Native American Students in Special Education


A poster presentation from the University of Montana that was presented at the American Psychological Association conference in 2016.

You can view and download the full document here. 


Webinars - STRATEGIES FOR WORKING WITH STUDENTS WITH AUTISM IN THE GENERAL EDUCATION SETTING

If you only have 30 minutes for professional development, this series is for you!!! This twelve part series of 30-minute courses presented by Dr. Amanda Boutot was designed to give general educators, parents, administrators, paraprofessionals and others quick, practical strategies that can be easily implemented in the general education classroom.

(C) STRATEGY 3: CREATE PREDICTABILITY

WORKSHOP #SU1224754
This is the third course in a series of 12, 30-minute online courses. After completing Strategy 3: Create Predictability, a participant will be able to discuss: 1) Understanding an individual's need for predictability, 2) Establishing routines: Consistent schedules, 3) Establishing routines: Consistent activities and expectations, 4) Using visuals to support predictability, and 5) Preparing for changes.

(I) STRATEGY 9: USE BEHAVIORAL STRATEGIES THAT PROMOTE SUCCESS LEARNING

WORKSHOP #SU1224760
This is the ninth course in a series of 12, 30-minute online courses. After completing Strategy 9: Use Behavioral Strategies That Promote Successful Learning, a participant will be able to discuss: 1) Behavior management vs. discipline, 2) Using positive reinforcement vs. punishment, 3) Using positive behavioral supports, 4) Using group vs. individual behavior systems, 5) Using behavior contracts and self-management system, 6) Selecting a reinforcement system.

Work in progress: An inside look at autism’s job boom

George glares at me from behind his desk. His hair is buzzed short and his mouth is set in a sneer. He asks about my prior work experience, then replies sarcastically, “Okay, well, what you’d be doing here would be a little different from that.”
This would be the toughest job interview I’ve ever been on, if it were real. Luckily, George is a digital avatar, speaking to me from a large screen. He’s part of a team of virtual job interviewers helping to train young adults with autism at the Dan Marino Foundation in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Students here learn workplace skills, train for industry certifications and complete internships. With the avatars (who may or may not be in a good mood), they also practice interviewing — a hurdle that otherwise can be insurmountable for job seekers with autism.
Learning to handle an interview is only the first step for people with autism looking for work. Often, they have no college degree, and if they do have experience, it may be from several jobs that didn’t last long. When at work, they may struggle with anxiety, have trouble communicating with their managers or estrange coworkers with their behaviors. In the United States, only 55 percent of adults with autism had worked at any point during the six years after high school graduation, according to a 2012 study. By contrast, 74 percent of young adults with intellectual disability had some work experience.