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Thursday, July 4, 2019

FREE Online Autism Training from the OPI Montana Autism Education Project



The OPI Montana Autism Education Project is offering 84 hours of online training in Teaching Procedures, Behavior Interventions and Focused Topics to public school staff in Montana who educate students with autism spectrum disorders. The training can provide 79 OPI Continuing Education Units.

A listing and description of the training content can be found here. The training can be taken for OPI renewal units and ASHA CEUs and SWP/MFT/LAC/ CEUs. 

New groups start the beginning each month and you will be sent information then to begin your training. 

You can find more information and register for the online training here.


IMPORTANT INFORMATION IF YOU ARE TAKING THE TRAINING FOR ASHA CEUs:

Information for Speech-Language Providers

ASHA members and/or MT state licensed SLPs are qualified to earn ASHA CEUs for completing the online Relias Learning curriculum. In 2011, a MT licensed SLP completed the ATS training as an "Independent Study" course and earned ASHA CEUs.

ASHA requires that Independent Study activities are approved 30 days prior to the start of the learning activity.

Independent Study forms should be dated at least 30 days prior to the date of the first certificate for completing a module. Below is a link for the ASHA Independent study form. Independent study plans are limited to 20 hours. Participants fill out the form and send it to the Montana MSHA rep. Contact Doug Doty at ddoty@mt.gov for information on whom to send it to.  

The link below will take you directly to the Independent Study form:

http://www.asha.org/ce/self-direct/isteps/
 


Monday, September 17, 2018

A blood test for autism? Not so fast, experts say

A new study suggests that its results could lead to a simple test for some children with autism, but statisticians say the test — even if validated — could not be used to screen for autism in the general population.
The study, published Thursday in Biological Psychiatry, says about 17 percent of children with autism have unusual proportions of amino acids — the building blocks of proteins — in their blood1. A test that looks for these molecules correctly identifies nearly 94 percent of this subgroup of children.
However, those results only hold because of the study’s statistical design, experts say. In the general population, the test’s accuracy would be less than 8 percent.

Reinforcement Strategies











Find good descriptions and examples of other reinforcement strategies here. 


A video showing Differential Reinforcment procedures. 


This video defines and gives examples of different types of reinforcers. The video also describes the proper way to deliver reinforcers and provides suggestions to ensure that reinforcers maintain their interest to the child.

The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities

This workbook is designed for youth and adults working with them to learn about disability disclosure and help them make informed decisions about whether or not to disclose their disability and understand by considering how that decision may impact their education, employment, and social lives. Based on the premise that disclosure is a very personal decision to be made by young people themselves, the workbook helps young people think about and practice disclosing their disability.

Research adds heft to link between autism and obesity


Nearly half of American children with autism aged 10 to 17 are overweight or obese, compared with less than one-third of their typically developing peers, according to a new study1. And those with the most severe autism features appear to be at the greatest risk of being obese.
After controlling for race, ethnicity, income, age and sex, the researchers estimate that children with autism have 1.48 times the odds of being overweight, and 1.49 times the odds of being obese, compared with their typical peers.
Among autistic children, those with severe autism traits — based on parent reports — are more than three times as likely to be obese as those with milder traits. This subset of children may be at increased risk of obesity because they tend to be less active and have more restricted diets than other autistic children
Read more here at Spectrum. 

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Autism 101: Parenting advice from total strangers




.Click here to view the video

Webinar - Self-Injury and ASD - Updates

Wed, Sep 26, 2018 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM MDT

Find more information here.

Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC)

A major obstacle in autism research has been the lack of a valid means of measuring the effectiveness of various treatments. Over the years, researchers have published hundreds of studies attempting to evaluate different biomedical and psycho-educational interventions intended to benefit autistic children.

Much of this research has produced inconclusive or, worse, misleading results, because there are no useful tests or scales designed to measure treatment effectiveness. Lacking such a scale, researchers have resorted to using scales such as the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), the Gilliam Autism Rating Scale (GARS), or the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC), all of which were designed to diagnose autism- to tell whether or not a child is autistic--and not to measure treatment effectiveness.

The Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC) was developed by Bernard Rimland and Stephen M. Edelson of the Autism Research Institute, to fill this need.

The ATEC is a one-page form designed to be completed by parents, teachers, or caretakers. It consists of 4 subtests:
I. Speech/Language Communication (14 items);
II. Sociability (20 items);
III. Sensory/ Cognitive Awareness (18 items); and
IV. Health/Physical/Behavior (25 items).

Read more here at the Autism Research Institute.

Some conditions tend to accompany autism in pairs

Children with autism are more likely to have both sleep problems and constipation than would be expected based on the prevalence of each of those conditions. Young autistic children are also unexpectedly likely to have both sleep and eating troubles.

The findings come from a large study of autistic children aged 17 months to 17 years who visited a network of autism clinics in the United States between 2010 and 20161. The researchers analyzed how often any of 12 conditions that commonly affect people with autism occur together in these individuals.

Read more here at Spectrum.

Rebooting Becky’s brain

An electrical brain implant all but erased the obsessions that had consumed Becky Audette, years after her autism diagnosis. Could similar implants help other people with severe autism?

Read more here at Spectrum.