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Thursday, July 4, 2019

FREE Online Autism Training from the OPI Montana Autism Education Project



The OPI Montana Autism Education Project is offering online training in Teaching Procedures, Behavior Interventions and Focused Topics to public school staff in Montana who educate students with autism spectrum disorders. The training provides 77 courses and up to 110 OPI renewal units.

A listing and description of the training content can be found here. The training can be taken for OPI renewal units, ASHA CEUs and SWP/MFT CEUs. 

New groups start the beginning and middle of each month and you will be sent information then to begin your training. You will have 90 days to complete the training.

You can register for the online training here.


IMPORTANT INFORMATION IF YOU ARE TAKING THE TRAINING FOR ASHA CEUs:

Information for Speech-Language Providers

ASHA members and/or MT state licensed SLPs are qualified to earn ASHA CEUs for completing the online Relias Learning curriculum. Independent study plans are limited to 20 hours. ASHA requires that Independent Study activities are approved 30 days prior to the start of the learning activity. If you are planning to take the training for ASHA CEUs it is best to get ASHA approval before registering for the training.

Participants fill out the form and send it to the Montana MSHA rep. Contact Doug Doty at ddoty@mt.gov for information on whom to send it to. The link below will take you directly to the Independent Study form:
http://www.asha.org/ce/self-direct/isteps/
 


Friday, April 19, 2019

Community Investment Fund

Do you have an interesting idea or project to promote inclusion for people with disabilities? Would a small amount of start-up funds help you get your project off the ground? Applications for the Community Investment Fund are now being accepted...complete and return your application before the May 1, 2019 deadline. Please note: due to University contracting requirements, successful applicants will be required to have liability insurance and either Workers’ Compensation coverage or a Workers' Compensation exemption certificate. Applicants will be notified of funding decisions by June 30, 2019.
Directions for using PDF form: Open the PDF file and save it to your desktop. Fill out the form and save it again. Then either print a hard copy of the application and submit it by mail or fax, or attach the PDF form to an email and submit it electronically.
For more information, please contact:
Kim Brown
University of Montana Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities
33 Corbin Hall
Missoula, Montana 59812
Email: brown@ruralinstitute.umt.edu
Voicemail: (406) 243-4852

Webinars - Positive Practices in Behavioral Support

A Fully Interactive Webinar Presented by Thomas J. Willis, Ph.D.

Beginning April 23, 2019
In this interactive webinar, you will learn:
  • How to conduct a Comprehensive Functional Assessment to determine the function of the behavior 
  • How to develop a multielement Positive Behavior Support Plan based on a functional assessment 
  • How to regain rapid and safe control over crisis situations using positive strategies 
  • How to ensure that the PBS plans that you write are consistently implemented 
  • How to reduce the use of restrictive practices
Topics Covered
  • Comprensive Functional Assessment | April 23 and 24, 2019 
  • Positive Behavioral Support | April 25 and 26 
  • Emergency Management and Reactive Strategies | April 30 and May 1 
  • Assuring Staff Consistency and the Provision of Quality Services | May 2 and 3 
Each topic is covered over 2 days, part A and part B. The daily schedule for the webinar is 9:00 AM (Pacific Time) to 12:30 PM.

Fee: $500 (USD) per person. Group rates are available, call 1-800-457-5575.

Go to www.iaba.com/webinars.html to download a complete brochure and register.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Autism Data Visualization Tool - CDC

There are several ways to estimate the number of children with ASD. This estimate is referred to as prevalence, a scientific term that describes the number of people with a disease or condition among a defined group (or ‘population’). Prevalence is typically shown as a percent (e.g., 0.1%) or a proportion (e.g., 1 in 1,000).
ASD prevalence estimates from the following four data sources are presented on this webpage:





Long-term benefit of Microbiota Transfer Therapy on autism symptoms and gut microbiota

Many studies have reported abnormal gut microbiota in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), suggesting a link between gut microbiome and autism-like behaviors. Modifying the gut microbiome is a potential route to improve gastrointestinal (GI) and behavioral symptoms in children with ASD, and fecal microbiota transplant could transform the dysbiotic gut microbiome toward a healthy one by delivering a large number of commensal microbes from a healthy donor.

We previously performed an open-label trial of Microbiota Transfer Therapy (MTT) that combined antibiotics, a bowel cleanse, a stomach-acid suppressant, and fecal microbiota transplant, and observed significant improvements in GI symptoms, autism-related symptoms, and gut microbiota.

Here, we report on a follow-up with the same 18 participants two years after treatment was completed. Notably, most improvements in GI symptoms were maintained, and autism-related symptoms improved even more after the end of treatment. Important changes in gut microbiota at the end of treatment remained at follow-up, including significant increases in bacterial diversity and relative abundances of Bifidobacteria and Prevotella. Our observations demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of MTT as a potential therapy to treat children with ASD who have GI problems, and warrant a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in the future

Read more here at Nature.

Summer Camps and Special Events - Helena



AKA - The CDC report finding 1/59 children had autism in 2014.

Prevalence and Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children Aged 4 Years — Early Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, Seven Sites, United States, 2010, 2012, and 2014

New autism prevalence stats spotlight challenge of early diagnosis

The prevalence of autism in 4-year-old children in the United States has increased — from about 1 in 75 children in 2010 to 1 in 59 in 2014 — to match a previously reported rise in 8-year-old children, according to data released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)1.

But children are still being evaluated for autism or other developmental conditions later than is ideal, the data suggest.

The trend highlights how difficult it is to diagnose autism in young children, experts say; early diagnosis is important so that children can be treated early.

The autism prevalence they identified among 4-year-olds in 2014 matches the prevalence among 8-year-olds that same year. (The two groups are not directly comparable, however, because the sites in the two studies don’t match up.)

The new study also shows some of the trends in variability among sites: the Missouri site has the lowest prevalence for 2014, at about 1 in 104 children, and the New Jersey site has the highest, at 1 in 35.

The prevalence in New Jersey increased significantly from 2010 to 2014, whereas the numbers remained stable in Arizona and Missouri.

There is no biological reason for the prevalence to vary so dramatically across the U.S., says Walter Zahorodny, associate professor of pediatrics at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, who led the analysis for New Jersey.

Read more here at Spectrum.

The Quest For the Roots of Autism — and What It Says About Us All

As clinicians view it, autism involves communication deficits and formulaic, repetitive behaviors that present obstacles to establishing conventional relationships. The soft borders of that definition — where does communication difficulty cross over into communication deficit? — suggest blurred margins between people who are diagnosed with autism and those who approach, but never quite cross, the line into diagnostic territory.

Those who do have diagnoses display behaviors on a continuum of intensity. Their use of spoken language ranges from not speaking at all to being hyperverbal. They can have a unique interest in the finer details of window blinds or an intense but more socially tolerated fascination with dinosaurs. As with many human behaviors, each feature exists on a spectrum, and these spectra blend in a person to create what clinicians call autism.

By pinpointing risk-associated genes and uncovering their roles, studying the roots of autism also is providing new insights into the development of all human brains, autistic or not. Here is a taste of what we now know, and what we don’t, about autism’s causes — and what that search is teaching us about everybody’s neurology.

They Know It When They See It

Read more here at Discover.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Cues Club - Helena

Contact Chris Caniglia at 406-461-2853 to register.  For additional information regarding our mission and class details refer to cuesclub.org