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Wednesday, April 12, 2017

10 Things ER Staffers Should Know About Autism

I’m autistic and also have a mental illness. I’ve had to go emergency rooms in hospitals a number of times. The experience has always been traumatic and unhelpful. I’ve experienced a lot of paternalism, been treated as if I’m a naughty child and invalidated in many other ways.
Here are 10 things that could help ER staffers to assist autistic patients, visitors and support people:
4. Waiting for an indeterminate amount of time is stressful to almost all autistic people and any relatives with them. If an autistic person asks you how long they will wait for treatment or to be taken to a bed in the ward once the decision to admit the patient is made, they aren’t being difficult or pushy, they’re just anxious because they want to understand how long they will be there for. 
Respond as accurately as you can. Even a little bit of information such as, “We are quite busy tonight, so it may be a few hours,” is more helpful than no information. This information is also useful to relatives waiting with the patient. They may choose to get some food or go home and sleep if it’ll be a long wait.